52 Church street
Cambridge
MA, 02138
617-547-5200

Frightened Rabbit – Tickets – The Sinclair – Cambridge, MA – February 22nd, 2018

Frightened Rabbit

10th anniversary of "The Midnight Organ Fight"

Frightened Rabbit

Wintersleep

Thu, February 22, 2018

Doors: 7:30 pm / Show: 8:15 pm

$35

Sold Out

This event is 18 and over

The Sinclair is general admission standing room only.

Frightened Rabbit
Frightened Rabbit
Ever since Scott Hutchison started releasing music as Frightened Rabbit more than a decade ago, his emotionally honest and incisively worded lyrics have been among the project's most beloved qualities. Over the course of five albums, including their new Painting of a Panic Attack, Frightened Rabbit's frontman has made poetry of his misery, and still somehow managed to make it sound anthemic -- like a triumphant rallying cry rather than a downer. In all of those respects, Painting of a Panic Attack -- produced by The National's Aaron Dessner -- is the band's most accomplished collection yet. "Great songwriters touch a nerve, and I think Scott really touches a nerve with these songs," says Dessner. "To me, lyrically, this album is a step above anything he's written before."

Beginning with the 2006 debut album Sing The Greys, Frightened Rabbit have become one of the U.K.'s most beloved exports. Though originally self-released, Sing The Greys earned the band a deal with indie label Fat Cat Records, who re-released the album and the two that followed: 2008's Midnight Organ Fight and 2010's The Winter of Mixed Drinks. Their last album, 2013's Pedestrian Verse, marked their Canvasback / Atlantic Records debut, as well as their most critically and commercially successful albums to date. In the UK, that LP was dubbed "a triumph" by The Quietus, while The Guardian described it as "a collection of stirring, instant anthems." Equal praise came from wide swath of U.S. outlets, including Rolling Stone, Time magazine, and Pitchfork, who praised Hutchison's "lucid assessments of social and emotional turmoil." The album also helped Frightened Rabbit achieve new commercial milestones, bringing a Top 10 debut in the U.K..

"I think a lot of this new record is informed by reaching a conclusion of sorts with Pedestrian Verse -- closing a door on a sound that we came the closest to achieving with that album," says Hutchison. After taking some time off from Frightened Rabbit to record and tour in support of the 2014 solo album he released as Owl John, the singer returned to his band with the goal of continuing to explore new approaches to songwriting. One important aspect of that evolution has been a shift to a more collaborative process, with all five band members contributing as songwriters.

Painting of a Panic Attack began in the summer of 2014, when the band -- Hutchison, his brother/drummer Grant Hutchison, bassist Billy Kennedy, guitarist/keyboardist Andy Monaghan, and multi-instrumentalist Simon Liddell (who worked with Hutchison and Monaghan on Owl John and joined Frightened Rabbit after Gordon Skene's amicable departure) -- convened in Wales to begin demoing ideas. "We started as though we were making an instrumental album," Hutchison explains. They wrote and tracked approximately a song a day during the course of a couple weeks and ended up with a dozen ideas that Hutchison took back with him to his new home in Los Angeles, where he would tackle the lyrics.

The singer had relocated there from Glasgow earlier that same year, and, although initially optimistic about the move, he was surprised to quickly discover that he felt profoundly out-of-step in LA. "I don't usually get homesick," he says, "but I'd never gone so far from home for such a long period of time before." Being disconnected by friends, family, and especially his bandmates was a stark contrast to his life while making Pedestrian Verse, where the band moved in together, forging a camaraderie and connection that was, in Hutchison's own words, "gang-like."

As he worked his way through the Wales demos, Hutchison says, "I was circling what could be a central idea for this record -- this sense of not really being sure why I was in LA. But I was still avoiding admitting that that was how I felt." He sent a few tracks to his brother Grant for some feedback. "Grant was like, 'Are you really saying what you think here?,'" Hutchison recalls. "Initially I was pissed, but as I thought about it more I realized that he was right. That, out of the desire for this album to be different, I was avoiding writing about the stuff that actually matters to me and the things that were going on with me at the time. I was fictionalizing a bit too much. And after that conversation, a lot of things came into focus."

The first thing he wrote after that -- the anthemic "I Wish I Was Sober" -- is sure to become one of Painting of a Panic Attack's signature songs. "It's a lonely song," says Hutchison. "There's a lot of that on this record, because I was really lonely in LA. And I think that's what 'I Wish I Was Sober' came to represent: that desperate point where you're like, 'I have had too much and I don't have anyone to lean on.'"

Of first single "Get Out" -- a tune about a lover you'll never get over -- Hutchison says: "'Get Out' is about that person to whom you are completely addicted. They are a drug, and the one that you don't feel like quitting. They live in your blood and will not leave. I've always found it compelling to write about the physical nature of love and loss, rather than the mental aspect. 'Get Out' continues that exploration and takes it to a somewhat obsessive level."

As Hutchison continued to work on the new songs, he reached out to Dessner to discuss collaborating -- maybe writing a couple songs together. The two musicians originally met in 2013, when Frightened Rabbit opened for The National on a month-long tour. But Dessner was also a longtime fan of the band, and quickly became the obvious choice to produce Painting of a Panic Attack. "Before this," Hutchison notes, "we'd never actually worked with a producer who had such a distinct awareness of our catalog and where we'd been as a band. And Aaron was very mindful of that -- what we had done in the past and where we needed to go with this album to take us creatively forward."

Frightened Rabbit arrived at Dessner's Ditmas Park, Brooklyn studio last August with thirty contenders for Painting of a Panic Attack, and whittled down from there over the course of the following month. As they considered which direction the album should take, Hutchison says it became clear that the best tracks were the ones with the most emotional immediacy. "'I Wish I Was Sober' is not the first song I've written about being drunk, and 'Break' is not the first song I've written about being a fuck-up and wishing I wasn't, but it turns out there are many ways of expressing that," says Hutchison. "I think people who are fans of our band come to us for a sense of belonging. I know that's not unique to us, but I really do believe that our music can come to a person at a pivotal point in their life and that we can become this place to consider where you are in the world."
Wintersleep
Wintersleep
The Great Detachment, Wintersleep's sixth LP and first with Dine Alone Records, is very much an introspective work, both conceptually and thematically. Of course, it delivers a welcome dose of the atmospheric, entrancing alt-rock for which the band has become known - the beautifully orchestrated arrangements anchored by haunting, almost hypnotic vocal melodies; however, the way those arrangements were approached and the poetry they relay are very much the product of some self-(re)discovery.
Following the tour cycle in support of Hello Hum, their critically-acclaimed 2012 release, the members of Wintersleep - vocalist/guitarist Paul Murphy, drummer Loel Campbell, guitarist Tim D'eon, bassist Mike Bigelow, and keyboardist Jon Samuel - opted to take some much-deserved downtime. But as Campbell shares, it didn't last long.
"We were all pretty excited to get back to work," he says, so in lieu of time off, they decided to write and demo new music at their own pace. After all, since their breakout success behind 2007's Welcome To The Night Sky, downtime had almost become a dirty word. "So there was something very freeing and refreshing about slowing down and rediscovering things," D'eon shares.
After writing a wealth of material in their Montreal studio, the band carefully curated the 11 songs comprising The Great Detachment and returned to Halifax's Sonic Temple - the birthplace of Welcome To The Night Sky and its preceding 2003 self-titled and 2005 untitled efforts - with producer Tony Doogan (Belle & Sebastian, Mogwai).
The band recorded the majority of The Great Detachment live-off-the-floor, adding an organic and transparent aural aesthetic to the collection. "It's a very different energy," Murphy opines, "and one that we kind of missed."
Tracks like "Amerika" and "Freak Out" are propulsive rockers, showcasing crashing guitars and clever hooks ripe with the raw emotion of earlier hits like "Oblivion" and "Black Camera." Conversely, "Metropolis" dances into darker territory, slightly more subdued to push focus towards the beautifully layered vocals while "Shadowless" reaches the furthest end of the spectrum, wrapping the listener in a warm sonic blanket of ambience and slow-building catharsis.
And matching its musical process, the lyrical thread sewn throughout The Great Detachment is one of introspection and identity; of reflection and contemplation.
The energy and urgency inherent in these songs makes them well-suited to the stage, adding more ammo to a captivating live show that's already earned these JUNO winners tours of several continents; stages shared with Pearl Jam, Broken Social Scene, and The Hold Steady; a performance on Late Night with David Letterman, and even an opening slot for Sir Paul McCartney - hand-picked by the fab one himself.
Two years in the making, The Great Detachment marks a return to the organic approach of Wintersleep's earlier works that simultaneously sees them reaching new pinnacles of songwriting and production. It captures their sonic essence, to be sure, but pushes it to a new plateau - proof that contemplation and introspection can actually lead you somewhere new.
Their first single from The Great Detachment - Amerika - was wholly embraced at radio in Canada, occupying the #1 slot at BDS overall commercial Rock radio for 11 weeks and #1 at commercial Alternative radio for 8 weeks. By November 2016, Amerika had reached 1 million streams on Spotify. The accompanying Amerika video, a post-apocalyptic world view directed by Scott Cudmore was nominated for a UK Music Video award. The band's second radio single, Spirit is making similar waves on at Rock and Alternative radio.
Wintersleep headlined Festival D'été in Quebec City, BC's Pemberton Festival, Halifax's Gridlock Festival, Edmonton's Sonic Festival, Calgary's X Fest and played Winnipeg's Interstellar Rodeo, among others. They also supported Blonde Redhead on a sold out US west coast tour. In August, they performed a full set for the Blue Jays' Fan Fest Fridays. Singer Paul Murphy threw the first pitch of the game before the Blue Jays won against Minnesota. In the fall, they toured the album in Europe.
Since the release of The Great Detachment, the band's line-up has changed, with bassist Mike Bigelow leaving the group amicably in June 2016 and Scott Remila filling in for the summer and fall 2016 dates. For the winter Canadian tour, Chris Bell joins the band on the road.
Venue Information:
The Sinclair
52 Church St
Cambridge, MA, 02138

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