52 Church street
Cambridge
MA, 02138
617-547-5200

The Suitcase Junket – Tickets – The Sinclair – Cambridge, MA – May 31st, 2017

The Suitcase Junket

The Suitcase Junket

Caroline Rose

Wed, May 31, 2017

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

$15

This event is 18 and over

The Sinclair is general admission standing room only. Tickets available at AXS.COM, or by phone at 888-929-7849. No service charge on tickets purchased in person at The Sinclair Box office Wednesdays-Saturdays 12-7PM. Please note: box office is cash only.

The Suitcase Junket
The Suitcase Junket
The Suitcase Junket w/ Special Guests Lula Wiles, Kate Lorenz, Tim Gearan, and TBA


Swamp Yankee and one-man band The Suitcase Junket (Matt Lorenz) appears tonight with a cast of Special Guests that includes string celestials Ellie Buckland, Isa Burke, and Mali Obomsawin a.k.a. Lula Wiles; sister Kate Lorenz of Rusty Belle and Kate Lorenz & The Constellations; and Tim Gearan ("Americana Star ... Boston's Best-Kept Secret" -- The Patriot Ledger). With more guests TBA, this is a night of unpredictable wonders.

From the salvaged sounds of American juke joints, back porches, honky tonks and rock clubs, The Suitcase Junket conjures an entirely new sound in his essential rock collection Pile Driver.

"After seeing and hearing the unique musical output of Matt Lorenz, “The Suitcase Junket”, we were enthralled ... " -- Make magazine, which premiered The Suitcase Junket's official video "Mountain of Mind"
makezine.com/2017/09/11/garbage-art-diy-instruments-swamp-yankee/

The Suitcase Junket's "songs range from the arty grunge of “The Next Act” and punk-blues stomp of “Evangeline” to the fingerpicked “Busted Gut” and the uplifting “Mountain of Mind,” its support for people in transition sealed by a catchy wordless chorus. They appear on Pile Driver, his fourth album and April debut on Signature Sounds, the same label that launched Lake Street Dive ... " -- Improper Bostonian

"Lorenz, a master of multitasking, plays guitar while drumming with his feet and boasts the astonishing ability to sing two notes at once using a technique similar to the one made famous by Tuvan throat singers. When it comes right down to it, though, Lorenz relies as much on methods tried-and-true: bluesy guitar riffs, tenacious melodies and a singing voice both weathered and nimble. You don’t need to witness his physics-defying performance to be captivated; the music stands on its own." -- WBUR, Boston
Caroline Rose
Caroline Rose
An obsession with money, an unfaithful lover, a friend’s accidental pregnancy, misogyny,
loneliness, death… This is just some of the lighthearted subject matter that make up LONER––the
darkly comedic second album from songwriter/producer Caroline Rose. Armed with an arsenal of
new instruments and equipment, an ever-growing sense of “ahhh fuck it,” two years of
exploration, and a wicked sense of humor, Rose delivers a set of serious songs wrapped in a
sprightly, angsty pop burrito. Because, as Rose puts it, “Sometimes sad songs just need a
cocktail.”

LONER captures the cheeky satire, comical musings, and often jarring mood swings––sometimes
goofy, sometimes emotional––that make up much of Rose’s personality. “I call it Schizodrift,” she
says sipping on a martini with her pinky out. “I want to make music that sounds as manic as I
feel.” Filled with catchy synth hooks, Ray Manzarek-esque Farfisa, surf guitar, depth of thought
and a punk attitude, LONER captures the energy of bands like Le Tigre and The Cramps, and
nods to the styles of Blondie and DEVO, the pop hooks of icons like Justin Timberlake, all the
while being inspired by the artistry of Kate Bush. “I’d say this album was as much inspired by
Justin Timberlake and Britney Spears as it was late 70s punk.” How did she get here? According
to Rose, the transition was natural.

LONER began about three years ago. “I was 24, lonely, and realizing life might actually be as hard
as people said it was. Gandalf had yet to raise his staff and part the seas for me,” she says with a
straight face. “I felt a bit disillusioned with my music; it didn’t sound like my personality. I hadn’t
dated in years, I was going to lose health care. I felt detached from the modern world.” So what
did she do about it? “I joined Tinder. I turned 25 and rented my first real apartment and painted it
bright colors. I started socializing more and little by little, weeded out all my clothes that weren’t
red. I embraced my queerdom. I had a girlfriend, we traveled the country, we broke up. I
discussed politics, capitalism and Rihanna. For better or worse, I became a member of the
modern world. Turns out the modern world is terrifying,” she says attempting to pluck an olive out
of her glass.

When it came to writing about all of it, what followed marked the beginning of a fully formed
Caroline Rose. “I needed to get more personal, more aggressive. more humorous and more
sonically diverse than my older material,” referring to 2014's slinky indie-folk-rockabilly-tinged
album I Will Not Be Afraid. The record was penned over four years ago while Rose was living in a
van traveling the country, and received critical acclaim from national press outlets like NPR and
Rolling Stone. LONER, however, marks a significant leap forward both sonically and emotionally,
unleashing a burgeoning confidence teeming with character. Asked how she’d describe the
transition, Rose responds, “It just felt like a bubble inside me that had been growing and was
about to pop.” In a burst of creative energy, she penned and produced a slew of songs that
began circulating among labels and press, resulting in a Tiny Desk Concert for NPR Music.

Over the next year and a half, Rose “got super into production and mixing––I was working
10-hour days creating new sounds, finessing EQ, blending tones, sampling basically everything.
Having an apartment [rather than living in a van] gave me the space to have more instruments
than just a guitar. I started collecting synths and recording equipment and tracking my material. I
signed with a label that gave me a lot of creative control and resources.” After sessions and
meetings with over a dozen producers, Rose chose to co-produce alongside Paul Butler
(Devendra Banhart, Michael Kiwanuka, Hurray For The Riff Raff) at Panoramic Studio in Stinson
Beach, California and the studios of Butler and Rose. A multi-instrumentalist and producer
herself, Rose brought to the sessions pre-recorded work the two used as a foundation off which
to build, having written and arranged strings, played and recorded keys, guitar and bass, sampled
layers of found and recorded sounds, and programmed synths and drums. “The rest was a lot of
experimentation in the studio, trying out different sounds and getting weird,” She adds. “Paul
added a lot in that way. Neither of us are afraid to try things and throw a bunch of sounds at the
wall.”

Another thing that drove Rose to pursue production more seriously was the blatant lack of gender
diversity in the music industry. “I noticed over the course of all these meetings there was not a
single female or nonbinary producer. Then the more I read up on why, the more I realized there
actually are a lot of us, we just aren’t taken as seriously and either don’t receive or don’t demand
the credit that we deserve.” In response, Rose stepped up across the board, having a hand in
mixing as well as directing creative control over all aesthetics regarding the album. “I wanted to
make sure everything was as me as it could possibly be.”

According to Rose, the visuals and aesthetics of LONER are an important vehicle in bringing out
her personality, as well as a lot of the more sarcastic elements within the music. “I’ve gotten really
interested in the visuals over the years, from producing videos and creatively crafting the images
to how I express myself via what I wear.” The video for “Money,” for example, written and
directed by Rose and Horatio Baltz, depicts Rose playing all of the parts––a sort of maniacal,
Coen Brothers-meets-David Lynch two-minute story involving three people (perhaps the same
person?) that leaves viewers asking…What just happened? Not too different a feeling after
listening to LONER, in fact. And this, is precisely how Caroline Rose wants you to feel.
Venue Information:
The Sinclair
52 Church St
Cambridge, MA, 02138

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