52 Church street
Cambridge
MA, 02138
617-547-5200

Gord Downie, The Sadies, And The Conquering Sun – Tickets – The Sinclair – Cambridge, MA – May 3rd, 2014

Gord Downie, The Sadies, And The Conquering Sun

Gord Downie, The Sadies, And The Conquering Sun

Doug Paisley

Sat, May 3, 2014

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

$18 advance / $22 day of show

This event is 18 and over

The Sinclair is general admission standing room only. Tickets available at TICKETMASTER.COM, or by phone at 800-745-3000. No service charge on tickets purchased in person at The Sinclair Box office Tuesdays-Saturdays 12-7PM. Please note: box office is cash only.

Gord Downie, The Sadies, And The Conquering Sun
Gord Downie, The Sadies, And The Conquering Sun
Gord Downie, The Sadies, And The Conquering Sun begins with “Crater”, a ragged anthem that erupts with frayed guitar and thundering rhythm. Dallas and Travis Good’s trudging riffs light the low-slung growl of Gord
Downie:

Hello there / Gentle Son / A crater / We’re creating!

“Crater” is an arrival: the mission statement of a young band unhinged, igniting ten songs of visceral punk rock exultation. Gord Downie, The Sadies, And The Conquering Sun is a spirited exploration of the darkness surrounding daylight, a rallying cry from the Secret Museum of Mankind: Crater! / Getting crushed in our dreams / Or in our dreams / Doing all the crushing

Downie’s words burn in unison with the charging Sadies, the mantra of a band forged out of primal necessity. This album is a vital, reckless, and ecstatic moment, gleaming with the proud imperfections of a group discovering its
voice.

It came together urgently but slowly, after the long-time Toronto friends first recorded together for Lake Ontario Waterkeepers in 2006. Fleeting sessions over the next seven years yielded finished songs in immediate, alchemical takes. Gord Downie, The Sadies, And The Conquering Sun is the action of first-thought-bestthought.

The project’s namesake, “The Conquering Sun” fuses The Sadies’ rusted psychedelia with Downie’s humble, volatile wail. Mike Belitsky’s roiling drums, and Sean Dean’s sure, standing bass spur the band through uncharted
desert-scapes.

Working the fugitive dust / Under the conquering sun / Nature, please be good to us / Under the conquering sun

Each song brims with energy, electricity embellishing a simple, rustic core. Acoustic inflections are cached in the album’s array of fiery environments, staggering in its balance of ferocity and craft.

Downie cries out possessed on “It Didn’t Start To Break My Heart Until This Afternoon”: a pulsating blast of brash
guitars and fuzzed-out gnarl.

Drive it like we stole it / Through the snowflakes, into the cold of the sun

On “Budget Shoes”, guitars shine over the tumbling bedrock of desolate but hopeful imagism. Downie writes in a universal voice, with a chorus taunting shadow from light. On “Los Angeles Times”, nations gather under that conquering blaze, singing unanimous poetry of promise and provocation:

Raise a glass of hope / Raise a glass of liberty / And a glass of something else / May we be at ease with ourselves!

The Sadies’ effortlessly invoke this primitive emotion, intuiting Downie’s themes with rollicking instrumental passages. On “Devil Enough”, Downie’s solemn musings are liberated by The Sadies’ roving plainsong; sobering
internal sentiment brought to life with the flame of improvisation:

You’re making me drop things / I can’t hold my cup / My state of being / Isn’t what it was / The light the light / And
my eyes adjust / What’s for sure is Devil Enough

“One Good Fast Job” sneers like a siren, blunt guitars circling Downie’s snarl. “Demand Destruction” pops with environmental pressure, coaxing an answer to a nuclear dilemma:

And as the sun went down behind the shadow / Of this invisible war / You say, “Is this accident ever over
anymore?”

Gord Downie, The Sadies, And The Conquering Sun spans depths and ages in its relentless halfhour, before concluding on an only note of reprieve. “Saved” dwells in the light of darkness, capturing our silent vibration of debt to the source. The album’s last moments glint in the rapturous calm of
collective awe:

You say nothing can be saved / It all goes away / Darkness falls and colours fade / And the music gets so loud it flaps your pant legs

Gord Downie, The Sadies, And The Conquering Sun boils with hope and irreverence; toils with fire as a tool and a curse. This is the combustion of brotherhood and dissent: music of wisdom and
innocence: It is the work, day is your word, night is the glue.
The Sadies
The Sadies
Internal Sounds, the anticipated new album from The Sadies, will be released September 17 on Yep Roc Records. In advance of the release, the new song “Another Tomorrow Again,” which American Songwriter describes as “…the perfect teaser for the album,” can be heard here: http://www.americansongwriter.com/2013/07/song-premiere-the-sadies-another-tomorrow-again/. Additionally, the album’s lead track, “The First 5 Minutes,” can be heard here: https://soundcloud.com/outside-music/the-sadies-the-first-5-minutes. In celebration of the album, The Sadies are currently in the midst of a Canadian tour; please see below for a list of dates.

Recorded in Toronto, the 11-track album was produced by The Sadies’ Dallas Good (guitars, organ, vocals) and mixed by Peter J. Moore. In addition to Good, the album features band members Travis Good (guitars, fiddle, vocals), Sean Dean (bass) and Mike Belitsky (drums). Of the experience, Dallas Good comments, “There was a conscious effort to deliver a finished product that wouldn’t suffer from a deadline or budget. We recorded this record over a span of a year, in session for 20-plus days. By the end, we’d spent every dime we had and used up every favor. There is usually a sense of immediacy to our records, maybe because we make a lot of them. I didn’t want that this time.”

Formed in Toronto in 1994, the band has released 16 studio albums, including 2010’s Darker Circles, which the A.V. Club describes as, “…full of strong melodies, beautiful guitars, and the ghosts of a unsettled past” and which Under The Radar praises as, “…twangingly irresistible guitar interplay.” Additional recordings include Precious Moments (1998), Pure Diamond Gold (1999), Tremendous Efforts (2001), Stories Often Told (2002), Favourite Colours (2004), In Concert Volume One (2006), Tales of the Rat Fink (2006) and New Seasons (2007). They have also released two albums with Andre Williams (1999’s Red Dirt and 2012’s Night and Day), an album with Jon Langford (2003’s Mayors of the Moon), an album with Neko Case (2004’s The Tigers Have Spoken) and an album with John Doe (2009’s Country Club). Country Club went on to chart on Billboard’s U.S. Country and Indie charts and reached #10 on the U.S. Heatseekers chart.

Recorded in Toronto, the 11-track album was produced by The Sadies' Dallas Good (guitars, organ, vocals) and mixed by Peter J. Moore. In addition to Good, the album features band members Travis Good (guitars, fiddle, vocals), Sean Dean (bass) and Mike Belitsky (drums). Of the experience, Dallas Good comments, "There was a conscious effort to deliver a finished product that wouldn't suffer from a deadline or budget. We recorded this record over a span of a year, in session for 20-plus days. By the end, we'd spent every dime we had and used up every favor. There is usually a sense of immediacy to our records, maybe because we make a lot of them. I didn't want that this time."

Formed in Toronto in 1994, the band has released 16 studio albums, including 2010's Darker Circles, which the A.V. Club describes as, "…full of strong melodies, beautiful guitars, and the ghosts of a unsettled past" and which Under The Radar praises as, "…twangingly irresistible guitar interplay." Additional recordings include Precious Moments (1998), Pure Diamond Gold (1999), Tremendous Efforts (2001), Stories Often Told (2002), Favourite Colours (2004), In Concert Volume One (2006), Tales of the Rat Fink (2006) and New Seasons (2007). They have also released two albums with Andre Williams (1999's Red Dirt and 2012's Night and Day), an album with Jon Langford (2003's Mayors of the Moon), an album with Neko Case (2004's The Tigers Have Spoken) and an album with John Doe (2009's Country Club). Country Club went on to chart on Billboard's U.S. Country and Indie charts and reached #10 on the U.S. Heatseekers chart.
Doug Paisley
Doug Paisley
Cameron House Records is proud to partner with Toronto singer/songwriter Doug Paisley on the Canadian release of his acclaimed EP, Golden Embers. Originally released in the U.S. in April 2012 through Paisley's New York-based label No Quarter, the five-track collection was recorded live-off-the-floor with a group that included Leslie Feist on harmony vocals, Blue Rodeo bassist Bazil Donovan, and mandolin virtuoso Joey Wright.

Pitchfork described the song "Sad Sinner," as a "quietly stunning elegy for innocence," while Exclaim! called another song, "Bats," "trademark Paisley: alternating effortlessly between wry, squint-eyed melancholy and Will Oldham-esque odes to joy." These notices for Golden Embers build on rave reviews Paisley has already earned in Rolling Stone, Mojo, The New Yorker, Uncut and many other media outlets for his previous two full-length albums.

When asked about his decision to work with Cameron House Records, Paisley says, "The Cameron House has been a part of my musical life since I began performing and going to shows there a decade ago. My musical roots are in bluegrass, which I played in weekly gigs at the Cameron, and which I've returned to on this EP. The Cameron House is my favourite Toronto venue, and I'm very pleased to have this EP on Cameron House Records."

Paisley will be accompanied by all of the players who contributed to Golden Embers, with Tamara Lindeman subbing for Feist on vocals.
Venue Information:
The Sinclair
52 Church St
Cambridge, MA, 02138

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