52 Church street
Cambridge
MA, 02138
617-547-5200

Titus Andronicus – Tickets – The Sinclair – Cambridge, MA – January 27th, 2013

Titus Andronicus

This show has been rescheduled from Nov 30. All tickets will be honored.

Titus Andronicus

Palma Violets

Sun, January 27, 2013

7:00 pm

$16 advance / $18 day of show

Sold Out

This event is all ages

Tickets available at TICKETMASTER.COM, or by phone at 800-745-3000. No service charge on tickets purchased in person at The Sinclair Box office Tuesdays-Saturdays 12-7PM, or at the Royale box office Fridays from 12-6PM.

Titus Andronicus
Titus Andronicus
Behold the amazing, yet true, story of the third Titus Andronicus LP, LOCAL BUSINESS.

It begins with a plan of action. While the first two LPs were elaborate concoctions, requiring the contributions of 30+ musicians, the most advanced computer wizardry and transmissions from an alternate universe, LOCAL BUSINESS would be of the earth, the handiwork of a living and breathing entity. No more would Titus Andronicus the studious recording project and Titus Andronicus the raucous touring machine be two distinct beings; there would only be Titus Andronicus, rock and roll band.

At the center of the band remained, as ever, singer-songwriter Patrick Stickles. Flanking him was the dynamic duo of Eric Harm on drums and Julian Veronesi on bass, rhythm section and principal backup singers. Returning to the fold was recent college graduate Liam Betson on guitar, whose studies kept him off the road but not away from the recording of the first two LPs. Rounding out the band was the latest addition, guitarist extraordinaire, and founder of Brooklyn DIY haven Shea Stadium, Adam Reich, moving gracefully from the position of live sound engineer to band member following the abrupt departure of keyboardist David Robbins.

With an album's worth of new songs in their pocket, Titus Andronicus took to the road in March of 2012, hashing out their new material night after night on tour, throughout the eastern United States and at the SXSW music conference. It would be the energy of the stage that they would strive to recreate in the studio.

The studio in question was New Paltz, NY's Marcata Recording, domain of master producer and engineer Kevin McMahon, whose credits include the first two Titus Andronicus LPs. Beginning on April 1st, the rare confluence of Palm Sunday and April Fool's Day, the converted barn became the band's home for the next two months. The first phase of recording found the band amassing hundreds of performances, playing together without headphones, three guitars strong, day in and day out, striving in pursuit of β€œthe perfect take.” A lengthy selection process followed, where the takes deemed most worthy of preserving for the ages were chosen. On top of these were placed much singing, still more guitars, and the contributions of an elite group of special guests – longtime Titus session keyboardist Elio DeLuca, famed violinist and string arranger to the stars Owen Pallett, and Eric's father, Steven Harm, blowing on a harmonica. This tight-knit group is just one of the meanings behind the phrase LOCAL BUSINESS. By the end of June, Kevin McMahon completed the mixing, and the mastering of the world famous Greg Calbi at Sterling Sound capped off the whole process.

But what of the songs themselves? While abandoning the linear narrative of The Monitor, the songs of LOCAL BUSINESS aim to make explicit the implications of the first two LPs, that the inherent meaninglessness of life in an absurd universe gives the individual power to create their own values and their own morality. This individual is celebrated throughout LOCAL BUSINESS's ten songs, though surrounded by a world that pressures endlessly to consume and to conform. The title LOCAL BUSINESS speaks to this anti-consumerist agenda, but fear not; the contradiction of the LP as a consumer product speaking against consumerism will be discussed at length therein. LOCAL BUSINESS should also indicate an interest in contemporary affairs, moving away from the historical content of The Monitor. Along the way, we witness a devastating automobile wreck, a food fight (that is to say, a battle with an eating disorder), an electrocution, a descent into insanity, and ultimately, a forgiveness of the self for its many faults. Titus Andronicus even finds time to broaden its emotional palette to include moments of pure positivity, brief respites from the usual doom and gloom.

LOCAL BUSINESS will be released on October 22nd, 2012. The release will be followed by a tour of the United States, which too shall be unique in the history of Titus Andronicus, as the band taking the stage every night will be the same band which made the record being promoted. So shall the story be complete, from tour to studio to tour again, the same band of brothers executing a singular vision. Five men, ten songs, no bullshit. LOCAL BUSINESS.
Palma Violets
Palma Violets
For a long time if you wanted to hear the most exciting new band in Britain, you knocked on a tall black door off the Lambeth Road. An aging British Rail building - part art studio happening, part squat – Studio 180 was where south London's Palma Violets were gestating, away from sunlight and the world at large.

A thrilling rock'n'roll four piece channelling The Clash, the Mysterians, and the Bad Seeds, from September 2011 they were holed-up here writing songs "their friends could dance to" and occasionally putting on celebratory, ecstatic parties about which word quickly spread.

The opposite of the last significant development in English guitar music when the Arctic Monkeys became the first "MySpace band", harnessing the power of the internet and prompting BBC documentaries and convulsions in major record labels, the Palma Violets' rise has been notable by their total avoidance of the worldwide web.

In fact until a couple of months ago, they had no online presence, no music recorded, and no press team working for them, this wasn't the product of some fiendishly counter-intuitive marketing strategy, it was because all they cared about was playing shows.

"We didn't want to put ourselves on Facebook, Youtube or the internet because we hadn't recorded any songs," explains singer Sam Fryers. "We were making this noise together in a room for fun and that's where you had to experience it."

"The best way to see a rock'n'roll band is to go and see them play live," elaborates bassist Chilli Jesson. "That's all we wanted people to do."
"And of course, we hate being in recording studios," laughs Fryer.

It's not hard to see how word of mouth spread about the band. If you got through the door in that early period, what greeted you was an intoxicating sense of chaos. Beer being sold out of a dustbin in a makeshift kitchen, experimental artwork protruding from every wall, kids milling about, seemingly all friends, just waiting for the moment the band would start to play, normally around 11 at night, but sometimes a whole lot later.

In an airless basement that could hold 50 people, the band would finally appear in a hail of feedback and organ noise, before blazing their way through a short, incredible set: their sound a primitive, wild rock'n'roll music offering echoes of '60s garage and soul but with a defiant Englishness at its core, the band themselves radiating a ferocious energy, encapsulated in the tense and tactile interplay between Jesson and Fryer but driven forward by the incessant beat of Will Doyle's drumming.

After a period of parching drought in British guitar music, this was akin to stumbling across the oasis in the desert just before you and everyone else died of dehydration.

Unsurprisingly, it didn't take long for record labels to catch on and in the first few months of 2012, Palmas Violets were courted intensely. From the outset, though, they only ever wanted to sign to one, and that was Rough Trade.

As Jesson recalls:"When Rough Trade came down, it was so special. It was like they restored our faith in music. I mean they actually talked about music for a start. Geoff Travis was the only person who picked up on the fact that we were doing a cover of The Riveiras' 'California Sun'. The other guys talked about supermarkets and shelving and how we were going to penetrate the market."

The feeling was mutual.
Venue Information:
The Sinclair
52 Church St
Cambridge, MA, 02138

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